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Tripoli

Tripoli is quite unique in Lebanon in that it’s both a major city but also one that has retained a great deal of its history. The city boasts nearly 40 historical sites that date back to the 14th century, and many of them much earlier than that. From the famous citadel and the continuously operating old souks, replete with traditional craftsmanship, to the plethora of mosques and hammams, Tripoli is a history lover’s delight.

 

Beyond historical attractions, Tripoli is quite a fascinating city to wander through, full of narrow side streets dense with old apartment buildings. The corniche makes for an attractive stroll leading to the Tower of the Lions and past the harbor where you can easily find boats for hire that will take you to the Palm Island Nature Reserve.

 

The city also has a wonderful old bone yard from the days when steam trains operated across the country. A few old engines sit rusting away in an abandoned shed and can be seen from the street, along with some rolling stock and a few other outbuildings from the days when the yard was busy sorting cargo and passengers.

 

And if you’re a scuba diver, you’ll be interested to know that the wreckage of a WW II-era anti-submarine ship lurks 60 meters below the surface of the water off of Tripoli, its rigging and other features still in surprisingly good shape.


Getting there:

Quite simple, really: take the highway north – the city is about 85 kilometers (53 miles) away. You can’t miss it.

Byzantine Period Crusader Period French Mandate Mamluk Period Ottoman Period Persian Period Roman Period North Lebanon Tripoli District Autumn Spring Summer Winter Arts and Culture Entertainment Historical Tourism Religious tourism Shopping Sightseeing

Things to do

Al-Tawbah Mosque

Located in Al-Dabbaghah neighborhood near Khan Al-Asqar, Al-Tawbah Mosque has was frequently cited in the writings of travelers who visited Tripoli...

Al-Attar Mosque

Located in the souk area of Tripoli, the 14th century Al-Attar Mosque is one of the largest and most important mosques of Tripoli. Easily...

Al-Muallaq Mosque

Distinguished by its octagonal minaret, the Al-Muallaq Mosque is a mid-16th century Ottoman structure near the south end of Tripoli’s main street of...

Madrassa al-Burtasiya

Serving as a mosque today, the Madrassa al-Burtasiya, also known as the Bertasi, was built in the early 14th century and was severely damaged by...

Citadel of Raymond de Saint-Gilles

The Citadel of Raymond de Saint Gilles is among the most impressive in the Middle East, rivaling those in Aleppo and Amman, for sheer size and...

Hammam al-Jadid

Built by Asad Pasha al-Azm of Damascus at the south entrance of the city, this stunning public bath is called the "New Bath" because it’s only 275...

Rachid Karami International Exhibition Center

The Rachid Karami International Exhibition Center is a modernist complex of buildings designed in a classic International style of architecture by...

Izz ed-Dine Hammam

Named after Mamluk Governor Izzeddine Aybak, who died in 1298 and is buried in a mausoleum beside it, the Izzeddine Hammam was built on the site of...